Sandra Bullock Spills on Injury Caused by Being Blindfolded on the Set of ‘Bird Box’

Sandra Bullock Spills on Injury Caused by Being Blindfolded on the Set of 'Bird Box'
WENN/Joe Alvarez

During an appearance on ‘The Late Show’, the Oscar-winning actress tells host Stephen Colbert how she fell on her face while filming Susanne Bier’s post-apocalyptic thriller.

AceShowbiz
Sandra Bullock once fell on her face while she was blindfolded on the set of new film “Bird Box“.

The Oscar-winning actress takes on the part of Malorie Shannon in Susanne Bier’s post-apocalyptic thriller, which follows a woman and pair of children who are blindfolded, and must make it through a forest and river in order to avoid a supernatural entity that takes the appearance of its victims’ worst fears.

During an appearance on “The Late Show with Stephen Colbert” on Monday night, December 17, Sandra explained that not being able to see proved challenging, and she actually slipped and fell on one occasion.

“I ate it several times. The final eating was my fault,” she said, going on to recall how she lost her way while navigating a ravine. “I fell down and I was crawling back up. And then I took off in a run and there was a flash. And I realised it was my face meeting with some hard object. There was a little blood and a few tears, and I was O.K.”

Sandra went on to share that she ended up having her eyes covered for around “half” the time on the shoot. Though she and her castmates underwent a lot of preparation prior to filming kicked off.

“Someone came in and gave us, within three months, a way to navigate our senses. Once we don’t have sight you realise you can hear solid objects. You can sense that there’s a wall. I ran into the camera a lot, but it made it authentic,” the 54-year-old laughed.

During the interview, Sandra also participated in a round of Bullock or Bullocks? with host Stephen Colbert, where she shot down inaccurate stories about her on the Internet.

And in the game, she confirmed that she once worked as a waitress, and explained she believes everyone should work in customer service at some point in their lives.

“I was a really good waiter. I feel like that everyone should wait tables for at least a year before they go out into the workforce,” she insisted.